Affiliated Experts

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Gary Beach

Gary Beach

As an industry veteran, Gary Beach brings over ten years of information technology (IT) publishing experience and knowledge to his role as publisher of CIO Magazine. Beach’s primary responsibility at CIO is to create new business opportunities for International Data Group’s (IDG) fastest growing publication and its related products. He plans to further educate the community of the importance of reaching chief information officers and other management executives with IT vision.

Beach is widely recognized for his role in founding the U.S. Tech Corps, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to improving education through technology. He also serves on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National IT Workforce Committee.

During his tenure at IDG, Beach has also served as CEO of IDG’s Computerworld and Network World magazines. Prior to joining IDG, he held several executive positions at McGraw-Hill. A prolific public speaker, Beach has testified before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on the Year 2000 Technology Problem. Beach is an overseer at the Computer Museum in Boston and serves on the Board of Directors for both Gifts in Kind and NetDay.

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Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson is the George and Sandi Schussel Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the Director of the Center for eBusiness at MIT. His research analyzes how businesses can effectively use the Internet and other information technologies. This work has received six "Best Paper" awards from fellow academics and is frequently cited in the business press.

Erik is the Co-Editor of the Ecommerce Research Forum and has served on the Editorial Boards of the Communications of the ACM, Information Systems Research, Information Technology and People, Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, the International Journal of Electronic Commerce, and Management Science. Erik serves as an Associate Member of the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science and the MIT Center for Coordination Science. He is on the academic advisory board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and is a member of Time Magazine’s Board of Economists. Erik is the author of Wired For Innovation:How Inoformation Technology Is Reshaping the Economy (MIT Press, 2009), and coeditor of two books,Understanding the Digital Economy (MIT Press, 2000), and Strategies for eBusiness Success (Jossey-Bass, 2001), and coauthored Fostering Research on the Economic and Social Impacts of Information Technology on behalf of the National Research Council.

His Ph.D. is in Managerial Economics from MIT. Before joining MIT, he co-founded and directed a software development and consulting firm and taught two of the first courses on Artificial Intelligence and Knowledge-based Systems at Harvard University.

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Suk-Gwon Chang

Suk-Gwon Chang

Suk-Gwon Chang is a professor of MIS and Telecommunications at the School of Business, Hanyang University, Korea. His research interest is focused on national ICT policy, socio-economic justification of ICT investments, IT-based competition strategy, and digital convergence business models. He founded research forums in the areas of telecommunications management, IT strategies and digital convergence policies, and coauthored two books, Internet Industry Analysis (HYU Press, 2002) and Digital Convergence Strategy (Kyobo Book, 2005). He also published numerous academic papers in IEEE Transactions on Communications, Telecommunication Systems, Telecommunications Policy, Information Economics and Policy, Operations Research, Decision Support Systems, Journal of Knowledge Management, etc and more than 28 research reports.

Suk-Gwon has served as editor-in-chief and associate editor in many academic journals including Telecommunication Systems, Korean Telecommunication Policy Review, Journal of the KORMS society, Telecommunications Review, and Journal of the MIS Research. He founded in 2004 Digital Convergence Research, a non-profit research institute which specializes in digital ecosystem researches on ICT policy and strategies, and has consulted World Economic Forum, Ministry of Information and Communication (MIC) of Korean Government, and many local telecom, IT and media companies. He also serves as a member of the telecommunications policy advisory board at MIC. He received his Ph.D. in management science from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in 1984.

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Jane Fountain

Jane Fountain

Jane Fountain is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she is also founder and Director of the National Center for Digital Government and Director of the Science, Technology, and Society Initiative and the Center for Public Policy and Administration. Her research is focused at the intersection of institutions, global information and communication technologies, and governance.

Fountain is the author of Building the Virtual State: Information Technology and Institutional Change (Brookings Institution Press, 2001), which was awarded an Outstanding Academic Title 2002 by Choice, and has been translated into and published in Chinese, Portuguese and Japanese. Her current book project, Women in the Information Age (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming), focuses on gender, institutions and technology. She has published research on information and communication technology and the development of networked forms of organization and governance in Governance, Technology in Society, Science and Public Policy, The Communications of the ACM, and other scholarly journals. Fountain has served on several governing bodies convened to foster research on information and communication technologies and governance. She holds a double Ph.D. from Yale University, in organizational behavior and in political science.

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Dan Gordon

Dan Gordon

Dan Gordon is Research Director for Valhalla Partners, a Northern Virginia venture capital firm. Dan has twenty-eight years experience working with technology, as a computer scientist, software developer, manager, analyst, and entrepreneur.

Prior to joining Valhalla Partners, Dan was a Director and senior staff member at the PricewaterhouseCoopers Global Technology Centre, analyzing technology trends and consulting on technology-oriented strategies in the software, e-business, wireless, optical, networking, semiconductor IP, and life sciences arenas. He worked with clients from North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Australia. Dan was a Contributing Writer and Contributing Editor to the Technology Centre’s annual Technology Forecast, and a frequent speaker at industry and general business meetings.

Before joining PwC, Dan spent 20 years in Silicon Valley as a software technologist, manager, director, and entrepreneur, including senior technical roles at well-known Silicon Valley firms like Symantec, Intuit, and Oracle. Dan has also been involved in startup companies in the applied Artificial Intelligence and Web applications fields.

Dan has a B.A. (cum laude) from Harvard University and an M.S. from New York University in Computer Science. He is a Professional Member of the IEEE and ACM.

Dan lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and two children.

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Kenneth Kraemer

Kenneth Kraemer

Kenneth Kraemer is the Taco Bell Professor of Information Technology for Management at the Paul Merage School of Business. He is also Director of the Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations (CRITO), as well as Director of the Personal Computing Industry Center at UC Irvine. He has conducted research on the management of computing in organizations for more than 40 years. He is currently studying the globalization of knowledge work and innovation, the offshoring of new product development, the dynamics of computing in organizations, and the business value of IT and national policies for IT production and use.

Professor Kraemer is the author or co-author of 15 books, including recently published titles such as Global E-Commerce: Impacts of National Environment and Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and Asia’s Computer Challenge: Threat of Opportunity for the U.S. and the World? (Oxford University Press, 1998).

He has written more than 165 articles, many on the computer industry and the Asia -Pacific region, that have been published in journals such as Communications of the ACM, MIS Quarterly, Management Science, Information Systems Research, The Information Society, Public Administration Review, Telecommunications Policy, and Policy Analysis. Professor Kraemer has also been a consultant on IT policy to major corporations, the federal government, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the governments of Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, and China. He was the Shaw Professor in Information Systems at the National University of Singapore from 1990-1991.

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David Moschella

David Moschella

David Moschella is global research director at CSC Research and Advisory Services, a Computer Sciences Corp. company. He is also a regular columnist for Computerworld, the leading newspaper in the US information technology industry. His latest book, Customer-Driven IT, was published in February 2003 by Harvard Business School Press. A frequent speaker and commentator, he specializes in forecasting overall IT industry trends and their effect upon IT customer and supplier dynamics. He is the author of the 1997 book, Waves of Power, Dynamics of Global Technology Leadership. Over the last five years, he has written nearly 200 columns for Computerworld.

Prior to joining CSC Research, Mr. Moschella was Vice President of Content for MeansBusiness, Inc., an innovative e-learning start-up that built the Internet’s largest database of business ideas. In this capacity, he managed an editorial team that aggregated the key ideas and concepts from the world’s leading business thinkers into a single, searchable and object-based system. Prior to that Mr. Moschella spent 15 years with International Data Corporation (IDC), the world’s leading IT market research and consulting firm. For six years, he served as Senior Vice President of Worldwide Research. In this position, he was IDC’s main spokesperson on global IT industry trends, lecturing and consulting in some 30 countries around the world. He was also in charge of IDC’s global research strategy, including its worldwide market forecasts, quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and international product development. At IDC, Mr. Moschella oversaw IDC’s computers systems and peripherals research.

Mr. Moschella currently serves on the Merrill Lynch Technology Advisory Board. He holds a B.A. from Colby College and currently resides in London, England and Boston, Massachusetts.

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Susan Ness

A communications policy consultant, Susan Ness served as a Commissioner on the Federal Communications Commission from 1994 to 2001, where she championed the introduction of competition in telecom and video services, and played a key role on spectrum policy, including spectrum auctions, deployment of new technologies (PCS, digital satellite radio, digital terrestrial radio, digital television, and unlicensed spectrum), connecting schools and libraries to the Internet, and global telecom policy. She was senior FCC representative to three ITU World Radiocommunication Conferences, and a member of the U.S. delegation to multilateral and bilateral meetings.

She co-led the Federal Trade Commission Review Team for the Obama Presidential Transition. Previously, she was founding president and CEO of GreenStone Media, which produced 63 hours per week of original talk programming targeting women, for syndication on radio, Internet, satellite, and other platforms. She was Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Annenberg School (University of Pennsylvania) and Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center; vice president and group head of a national bank; and assistant counsel to the House Committee on Banking, Currency & Finance.

She earned a Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Boston College Law School, and a Masters in Business Administration from The Wharton School of The University of Pennsylvania.

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Jon Peha

Jon Peha

Jon M. Peha is the Chief Technologist of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Dr. Peha is also Associate Director of the Center for Wireless and Broadband Networking at Carnegie Mellon University, and a Professor in the Department of Engineering & Public Policy and the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering. His research spans technical and policy issues of computer and telecommunications networks. This has included spectrum, broadband Internet, wireless networks, video and voice over IP, communications for emergency responders, universal service, secure Internet payment systems, e-commerce, and network security. He also consults for industry and government agencies. Dr. Peha has addressed telecom and e-commerce issues on legislative staff in the House and Senate, and helped launch a U.S. government interagency program to assist developing countries with information infrastructure. He has also served as Chief Technical Officer of several high-tech start-ups, and as a member of technical staff at SRI International, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and Microsoft. Dr. Peha holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford.

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Paul Saffo

Paul Saffo

Paul Saffo is a forecaster and strategist with over two decades of experience exploring long-term technological change and its practical impact on business and society. Paul is Chairman of the Samsung Science Board, and serves on a variety of other boards and advisory panels, including the Stanford Advisory Council on Science, Technology and Society, and the Long Now Foundation, as well as the boards of several public and pre-public companies located the United States and abroad. He is also a Consulting Associate Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, and is a Fellow of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. Paul has served as an advisor and Forum Fellow to the World Economic Forum, which in the late 1990s named Paul one of its "100 Global Leaders For Tomorrow."

Paul’s essays have appeared in numerous publications, including Business 2.0, Fortune, The Harvard Business Review, The Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Washington Post and Wired. Paul holds degrees from Harvard University, Cambridge University, and Stanford University.

Some of Paul’s essays and thoughts by can be found at www.saffo.org.

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Jonathan Seelig

Jonathan Seelig

As a Managing Director of Globespan, Jonathan sources new investment opportunities, evaluates and negotiates investments, and serves on the boards of portfolio companies. Based in Boston, he focuses on investments in Communications and Internet/ Infrastructure companies. Jonathan, a successful entrepreneur himself, shares his company creation and operating experience, technical expertise, and broad international perspective to help the firm’s portfolio companies succeed.

Jonathan serves on the boards of Dotomi, FilmLoop, Linden Lab and Nextmedium. He also serves on the board of Zipcar, where he was an early investor. Jonathan co-founded Akamai Technologies, Inc., the leading global Internet content and application delivery services company. At Akamai, he managed global infrastructure development and deployment, international expansion, and business development in a fast-growth environment.

Before he founded Akamai, Jonathan worked at ECI Telecom in Israel where he held roles in product marketing and new product development, working with customers in nearly 40 countries around the world.

Jonathan earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics, with honors, from Stanford University. He was enrolled for an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, but left the program to found Akamai instead, “much to my mother’s chagrin.”

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Paul Taylor

Paul W. Taylor, Ph.D., is the Chief Strategy Officer at the Folsom, California-based Center for Digital Government, a national research and advisory firm on information technology policies and best practices in state and local government. Prior to joining the Center, Dr. Taylor served as deputy director of the Washington State Department of Information Services (DIS) and the Chief of Staff of the Information Services Board (ISB).

During his tenure as deputy state Chief Information Officer (CIO), Washington was named the nation’s original and sustained Digital State for three consecutive years, based on innovations in policy, planning, and practice. Among them, pioneering work in IT Portfolio Management, the award winning enterprise Digital Government Plan, an enterprise Internet-aware security policy, and the creation of a learning environment called The Academy where agencies come together to imagine the future and then build it.

Taylor plays an integral role in nearly every facet of the Center’s work, including editorial direction of its white papers and reports, the design and analysis of its national surveys, and is a frequent speaker at major conferences around the nation. He also advises state and local governments on policy, planning, and practice. In addition to being the back page columnist for both Government Technology and Public CIO magazines, he is the author of a number of book chapters and juried journal articles on a range of public policy issues, and the primary author of a series of reports and white papers on government modernization, including simple.gov: Its Time to Change the Story; Prove IT: The Discipline of Harvesting Value from Public Sector Information Technology; and The Sawyer Principles: Digital Government Service Delivery and the Lost Art of Whitewashing a Fence.

Dr. Taylor came to public service following decades of work in media, multimedia and Internet start-ups, and academia. He is a former Gilder Fellow and was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1994. He holds degrees from the University of Winnipeg, the University of Calgary and the University of Washington.

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Pierre de Vries

Pierre de Vries is a Research Fellow at the Economic Policy Research Center of the University of Washington, and a Senior Adjunct Fellow of the Silicon Flatirons Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is also a technology advisor to the Washington DC law firm of Harris Wiltshire & Grannis.

He researches and advises clients on the intersection of information technology and government policy. His current projects include regulatory paradigms for the internet/web, alternative conceptual models for wireless policy, spectrum allocation in the TV white spaces, and the impact of intangibility on decision-making in the digital world.

Dr. de Vries is a former Chief of Incubation and Senior Director of Advanced Technology & Policy at Microsoft Corporation, where his work included creating the company’s first integrated user experience design team, managing a portfolio of technology incubation projects for the Office of the CTO, supervising the founding and operation of the European Microsoft Innovation Centre, and framing the company’s world-wide “connected computing” technology policy agenda. He has worked in seed-stage venture capital and technology consulting, and holds a PhD in theoretical physics from Oxford.

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Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger is Visiting Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT’s Engineering Systems Division, and Adjunct Professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School. He is a member of BP’s Technology Advisory Council, the Visiting Committee for the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and the Board of Visitors for the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He was co-chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, as well as a founding member of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A native of Cuba, he was named the 2001 Hispanic Engineer of the Year.

Wladawsky-Berger was formerly Vice President for Technical Strategy and Innovation at IBM Corporation. There he was responsible for identifying emerging technologies and marketplace developments critical to the future of the IT industry, and organizing appropriate activities in and outside IBM in order to capitalize on them. In conjunction with that, he led a number of key innovation-oriented activities and formulated technology strategy and public policy positions in support of them. As part of this effort, he was also responsible for the IBM Academy of Technology and the company’s university relations office. He retired from IBM in May 2007.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger received an M.S. and a Ph. D. in physics from the University of Chicago.

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John Zysman

John Zysman

Professor Zysman has been a member of the University of California, Berkeley faculty since 1974, teaching European politics and political economy, and has been Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) since its establishment in 1982. He has written extensively on European and Japanese policy and corporate strategy; his interests also include comparative politics, Western European politics, and political economy.

Dr. Zysman received his B.A. at Harvard and his Ph.D. at MIT. His publications include How Revolutionary Was the Digital Revolution?: National Responses, Market Transitions, And Global Technology (Stanford University Press, forthcoming May 2006); The Highest Stakes: The Economic Foundations of the Next Security System (Oxford University Press, 1992); Manufacturing Matters: The Myth of the Post-Industrial Economy (Basic Books, 1987); and Governments, Markets, and Growth: Financial Systems and Politics of Industrial Change (Cornell University Press, 1983). He has hosted a number of conferences and meetings on issues facing the new “E-conomy,” including a conference in Washington D.C. in September 2000 entitled “The E-Business Transformation: Sector Developments and Policy Implications.” He has also contributed many articles and books to the academic discourse on e-commerce.

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